Lectures

All lectures will be held in English!

Dr. Aymeric Roccia: Phylogeny of the Genus Pinguicula

Summary
Despite a great enthusiam by taxonomists since the 1990s with many new species being described from Mexico, Cuba and the mediterranean area, the evolution of the Pinguicula genus was only investigated by molecular phylogeny means since 2005. Two markers drove those researchs, the nuclear ITS and the plastidial trnK, sometimes giving contradictory results. Those phylogenies were commented regarding the biogegraphy of the genus or morphological aspects such as the seed embryo anatomy. But they all push the taxonomists to reconsider the classical subdivisions of the genus made by Casper back to the 1960s, based on floral morphology and growing habits. In this conference, we will review the molecular phylogenetics studies and their main results, and try to understand how they are changing our view of the Pinguicula genus evolution.

About the speaker
Dr. Aymeric Roccia is a plant biologist, genetist and chemist, with speciality on scented, aromatic and medicinal plants. He received his Ph.D. in plant biology in 2013 from Jean Monnet University, Saint Etienne, France. He is author of a few peer-reviewed papers on rose perfume and recently described a new natural butterwort hybrid. He also contributed the Pinguicula chapter to Flora Gallica and is the lead author of Pinguicula of the Temperate North, one of the two volumes of the last revision of the genus Pinguicula. On January 2018, he coauthored with Andreas Fleischmann the Pinguicula chapter in Carnivorous plants physiology, ecology and evolution, dealing with butterwort systematics and especially phylogeny.

Mateusz Wrazidlo: Carnivorous flora of the Guiana Highlands: summary of 2017 & 2018 expeditions to Venezuela and Guyana

Summary
The so-called „Lost Worlds“ of the Guiana Shield, the domain of massive, ancient sandstone plateaus known as the Tepuis have for centuries nurtured the imagination of all kinds of adventurers, explorers and researchers. Known to host some of the most biodiverse and precious environments on our planet, until today they remain little explored due to their inaccessibility and currently also complicated political situation in the region. The lecture will present a short summary of two projects which were focused mainly on observing the carnivorous species of local flora: an expedition to Akopan Tepui & Cueva del Fantasma in January 2017 and a visit to the Potaro Plateau (Guyana) and Pütari Tepui / Sierra de Lema in Venezuela in April & May 2018.

About the speaker
Mateusz Wrazidlo is a mechanical engineer and a carnivorous & tropical plant grower with his main interest being the development of self-made growing systems for environmentally demanding species of flora. Since his introduction to the topic of carnivorous plant cultivation in 2003, over the years he has grown a particular fondness for the flora of the Guiana Shield, mainly the genus Heliamphora. Currently a PhD student at the Silesian University of Technology in Gliwice (Poland), working on a research project focused on the implementation of advanced data acquisition & analysis technologies for investigating the environmental particulars of the Guiana Highlands.

Miroslav Srba: Genetic background of fenestration in Sarracenia

Summary
Fenestration is one of the most beautiful examples of mimicry in plants. Pitchers of Sarracenia leucophylla mimic white flowers to attract its prey. Fenestration is also character of significant horticultural value as the white tops make the pitchers more attractive to most of the common customers. But what is behind this amazing character? Is it practically possible to make „Sarracenia purpurea“ with white fenestration in the end?

The lecture will demonstrate results of several breeding projects performed by Miroslav Srba. First results clearly demonstrated, that fenestration is pretty complex character, which cannot be easily transferred by segregation according to basic Mendel’s law. Playing with S x moorei breeding has showed something about validity of older hypothesis that all red varieties of S. flava, especially var. atropurpurea appeared as S. purpurea introgression to S. flava genome. Is such a story likely or is there another more-realistic explanation of S. f. var. atropurpurea ancestry?

About the speaker
Miroslav Srba is a postdoc researcher and lecturer at Department of experimental plant biology, Charles University in Prague (CZ). His primary scientific focus is heterotrimeric G-protein signaling in plants. His entousiastic passion is experimental hybridizing and breeding of carnivorous plants, mainly Sarracenia spp., but also Nepenthes and Pinguicula. He performed more than 700 Sarracenia hybrids since 1994. Miroslav Srba is main gardener and collection curator of commercial CP nursery www.sarracenia.cz of his wife Stanislava.

Dr. Simon Poppinga: Suckers and snappers – New insights into the ultrafast traps of Utricularia and Aldrovanda

Summary
In my talk, I will explain how the ultrafast suction traps of bladderworts (Utricularia spp.) and snap-traps of the waterwheel (Aldrovanda vesiculosa) work. Recent biomechanical and functional-morphological analyses together with prey capture experiments as well as mechanical modelling and computer simulations have led to a profound understanding of these sophisticated trapping devices. The audience can expect tons of insightful and spectacular high-speed footage of traps in action!

About the speaker
Dr. Simon Poppinga is a post-doctoral scholar and research group leader for plant movements, biomimetics, and elastic architecture in the Plant Biomechanics Group at the University of Freiburg, Germany. His research focuses on biomechanics and functional morphology of moving plant structures, especially of carnivorous plants traps. His other research interests include functional plant surfaces and the transfer of functional principles found in nature into technical applications (bionics/biomimetics).

Dr. Jan Schlauer: The Quinones of Arachnopus – Chemical Taxonomy of the ‚Indian‘ Sundews

Summary

Plumbagin and 7-methyljuglone are chemical constituents that allow delimitation of and distinction between sundew (Drosera) species or species groups because they are unevenly distributed in these taxa (Schlauer et. al. 2018). In this lecture this is exemplified for Drosera section Arachnopus (the „D. indica complex“), presenting new and intriguing insights into the diversity of this group. This is juxtaposed to microscopy images of the characteristic leaf and stem emergences that further distinguish the featured species.

About the speaker

PD Dr. Jan Schlauer (University of Tübingen, Germany) is a biochemist and plant taxonomist. His research focuses on secondary metabolism of heterotrophic plants and its relationship to diversification and phylogeny. Together with his studies in chorology and floristics it has implications for natural product chemistry, biodiversity evaluation/documentation, and conservation/sustainability.

References

Schlauer, J., Hartmeyer, S.R.H., Hartmeyer, I., Hennern, H., Hennern, A. (2018) Sundew Chemistry and Emergence Updates, Carniv. Pl. Newslett. 47: 10-17.

http://legacy.carnivorousplants.org/cpn/articles/CPNv47n1p10_17.pdf

Dr. Andreas Fleischmann: Sticky carnivorous plants and their inhabitants: mutualists, kleptoparasites and herbivores

Summary

So far, most studies of carnivorous plant inhabitants focussed on pitcher plant genera, where the pitchers form some kind of „mini aquaria“ (so-called phytotelmata) which often host a rich infauna an complex food webs. However, the open, exposed trap systems of sticky carnivorous plants also frequently harbor a rich arthropod community – ranging from herbivores to kleptoparasites and mutualists. In this talk, some light will be shed on the arthropods associated with the traps of Drosera, Byblis, Pinguicula and Roridula.

About the speaker
Dr. Andreas Fleischmann is research scientist and curator of vascular plants at the Botanische Staatssammlung München (Munich Herbarium), and researcher and lecturer at the GeoBio-Center of the Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich. He is a plant biologist, working on phylogenetics, systematics and ecology of carnivorous plants, with special focus on Droseraceae and Lentibulariaceae. He authored and coauthored several books and publications about carnivorous plants

Dr. Thomas Gronemeyer: The Nepenthes alata complex of species and other recent discoveries from the Philippines

Summary

Nepenthes alata was until recently considered as a highly variable species widespread over the Philippines. In 2013 Martin Cheek and Matthew Jebb redelimited N. alata Blanco to the hairy, one-flowered species from Luzon and resurrected the glabrous, one-flowered N. graciliflora Elmer to species rank. Since then, several new species were described that would have been considered as N. alata sensu lato before Jebb & Cheeks publication. Besides the species of the „N. alata group“, also other species were very recently discovered in remote areas on the Philippines. In this talk the key considerations from the taxonomic work on the N. alata complex are reviewed and other recent discoveries are presented.

About the speaker
PD Dr. Thomas Gronemeyer is a biochemist and lecturer for cell- and molecular biology at the University of Ulm, Germany. Since 2007 he participated almost yearly in expeditions to the Philippines, Sumatra and West-Papua. He discovered 10 new species from the Philippines and participated in the expeditions that led to the rediscovery of N. surigaoensis and N. paniculata.

Dr. Claus-Jürgen Lenz & Christian Dietz: Intersting species of carnivorous plants in Western Australia, Brazil, southeastern USA and Western Australia

Summary

During the past 10 years Dr. Claus-Jürgen Lenz and Christian Dietz have travelled to several countries to see carnivorous plants in their habitats. Besides some locations in Europe these countries include South Africa, the southeastern United States, central Brazil and southwestern Australia. In this lecture Dr. Claus-Jürgen Lenz and Christian Dietz will present some of the nicest and interesting locations they have seen in these countries. The plants they will show will be both Roridula species from South Africa, Philcoxia minensis from Brazil, Cephalotus follicularis from Australia as well as many species from Drosera, Utricularia, Sarracenia, and Genlisea shown not so frequently.

About the speaker
Christian Dietz has studied mathematics and is working in finance. He first got contacted with carnivorous plants at the age of 14 or 15. Dr. Claus-Jürgen Lenz has studied meteorology and climatology and worked about 20 years in scientific research. Now he’s working in a park and botanical garden. His first contact with carnivorous plants was as a young boy during tours in the Swiss Alps in the 1970s. The main interest of both is in the Genera Drosera, Sarracenia, Utricularia and Genlisea. After growing lots of plants and species outside and in their greenhouses the wish to see the cultivated plants in their natural growing habitat got stronger and finally resulted in several journeys to interesting places in both Americas, Australia, South Africa, and some locations in Europe.